Thursday, 24 November 2016

How eyes work


Light enters our eyes. Light from the sun, or an artificial light, travels in a straight line, bounces off objects and into our eyes through the pupil. Depending on the amount of light, the iris changes the size of the pupil to let more or less light in. The images we see are made up of light reflected from the objects we look at. This light enters the eye through the cornea. Because this part of the eye is curved, it bends the light, creating an upside down image on the retina (this is eventually put the right way up by the brain). The retina is a complex part of the eye, but only the very back of it is light sensitive. This part of the retina has roughly the area of a 10p coin, and is packed with photosensitive cells called rods and cones. Cones are the cells responsible for daylight vision. There are three kinds – each responding to a different wavelength of light: red, green and blue. The cones allow us to see images in colour and detail. Rods are responsible for night vision. They are sensitive to light but not to colour. In darkness, the cones do not function at all.

Information from:
https://www.sightsavers.org/eye/
http://www.sciencemadesimple.co.uk/curriculum-blogs/biology-blogs/how-do-our-eyes-work
Image from: https://kaiserscience.wordpress.com/biology-the-living-environment/physiology/vision-how-do-our-eyes-work/

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